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Political Firsts
Countless American women have struggled to achieve equality with men and gain access to the boardrooms of power. Below is a timeline of women who have changed the face of American politics by being first to run for office, be it the Presidency, the Supreme Court or the Congress.
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Family Law in Morocco
Award-winning author Dr. Mounira Maya Charrad has been following women's rights and the implementation and evolution of the family law of Morocco for the past several decades...
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Why Women Go Green
In most political parties, except in the Green Party, men far outnumber women. Since their inception, Green Parties worldwide have boasted a disproportionately high number of women members. In Europe, however, Green women also hold the majority of high-level leadership positions. For example, 32 out of 55 German Green Party parliament members are women...
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Environmental Warriors
Around the world, women have been at the leading edge of environmental activism, helping ensure a healthier planet for their families and future generations. The women profiled here are a just small sample of thousands of others who have put their lives on the line to restore and protect the environment...
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Del Ponte Administers Justice
There can be no peace, and hence, no democracy, where there is no rule of law, where human rights are violated, criminals run free and victims receive no redress. Justice is a key ingredient of democracy. And women have proven to be the key ingredient of justice. In 1999, United Nations Head Kofi Annan announced: "Justice is a woman." He was talking about Carla del Ponte, the newly appointed General Prosecutor for the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY)...
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CEDAW in San Francisco
The city of San Francisco is notorious for breaking the United States' political mold. When it comes to women's organizing, the trend is no different. In 1998, San Francisco became the first municipality to adopt CEDAW: the Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women. A United Nations human rights declaration, CEDAW has been ratified by 185 countries around the world; but not San Francisco's own federal government...
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The New Slavery: Domestic Workers in Lebanon
Domestic workers, the majority of whom are women, constitute a large portion of today's migrant worker population. The International Labour Organization (ILO), estimates nearly 19 percent of Lebanon's population is domestic workers. These workers send remittances home and contribute significantly to the national incomes of many labor-exporting countries in Africa, South and Southeast Asia...
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Governments Must Step Up So Women Don't Have to Step In
What role should governments play in providing basic necessities for their people? And who fills the gaps when governments fall short? The aftermath of the 2007-2008 bread crisis that erupted in Egypt highlights that women compensate when governments and others can't supply basic necessities such as health care, education and social services...
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The Body Economic
Around the world, women’s economic opportunities and choices have long been impacted by their ability to bear children. Women and their families frequently make tough choices and poignant trade-offs, which are either helped or made more difficult by public policies concerning fertility, work, and social roles...
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A Brief History of Marriage
Historically, a woman's marital status has significantly influenced her ability to control land, assets or income. Historian Karen Offen explores the constraints that women faced and discovers how some were able to escape them to achieve economic and political power.
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