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Political Firsts
Countless American women have struggled to achieve equality with men and gain access to the boardrooms of power. Below is a timeline of women who have changed the face of American politics by being first to run for office, be it the Presidency, the Supreme Court or the Congress.
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Victoria Woodhull
In 1872, women were not allowed to vote. But that didn't stop activist, businesswoman and spiritualist Victoria Woodhull from running for president. She nominated Frederic Douglass, a former slave, as her running mate.
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Granny D.
In June 2004, with Election Day only four months away, the Democratic Party was left without a candidate for the New Hampshire Senate seat. An unlikely contender stepped in to help bring out the vote. Standing just five feet tall, 94-year-old Doris Haddock had far more passion, determination and spunk than most 24-year-olds...
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The Ticket That Might Have Been
Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm was the first African-American woman elected to the United States Congress, and the first to run for President. She said she was proud to run, even though she knew she would lose. The aftermath of Shirley Chisholm's groundbreaking 1972 campaign is the subject of this article by women's rights advocate Gloria Steinem...
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Patsy Mink: Ahead of the Majority
I was a graduate student at the University of California Berkeley's journalism school when Patsy Takemoto Mink died in 2002.
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This Opportunity Brought To You By Feminism
I’ve written a great deal about how the historic election in the U.S...
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Fashion Is Political
Robin Givhan, the Pulitzer prize-winning fashion editor for the Washington Post, writes about the fashion industry and the ways in which it influences the lives of ordinary people who seldom find themselves walking along a red carpet. She refuses to accept the notion that fashion is somehow for "other" people...
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10 Questions with Erika Falk
Few Americans are aware that more than thirty women have run for the presidency of the United States. Victoria Woodull, a spiritualist turned successful Wall Street broker, was the first, in 1872. Her name did not even make it on the ballot, and it would take another half-century before women won the right to cast their vote in elections. In Women for President:Media Bias in Eight Campaigns, Erika Falk studied the presidential campaign of Victoria Woodhull and seven other prominent female presidential candidates--Belva Lockwood, Margaret Chase Smith, Shirley Chisholm, Patricia Schroeder, Lenora Fulani, Elizabeth Dole and Carol Moseley Braun...
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Intimate Symbols of Power
My art explores intimate themes using myself, friends and family as the subjects. My current series of paintings is about women's personal transformations and healing. I depict subjects who are in various states of emergence from patterns that have had a negative impact on their lives...
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Picturing Breast Cancer
A woman dying of cancer is wrapped in another woman's arms. Behind them, incinerators belch out dark clouds of smoke...
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