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Sarah Palin
What do you think of the presumptive 2008 Republican candidate for Vice President, Sarah Palin? Is this is a good choice? Does this advance women in politics? Share your thoughts! Skip to Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, <a
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Do Women Have to Vote for Women?
Recently, there has been a lot of criticism of current women leaders by leaders of women's organizations, asking whether they are accountable to women in their countries. This includes Senator Hillary Clinton, who is running for President in the U.S., President Cristina Fernandez in Argentina and Chancellor Angela Merkel in Germany...
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Picturing Power
All of us have seen a political poster past its time: peeling off a wall in tatters, or peeking out from underneath another poster of the next big thing.  Posters are, by their very nature, a throwaway form of art and communication.  But, when it comes to posters produced by and for India's women, one group wants to ensure these messages are not forgotten.
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Two Million Women Leaders and Counting
When Mahatma Gandhi envisioned a truly independent and democratic India, he envisioned gram swaraj-village self-rule. For Gandhi, true village autonomy meant that all adults--women and men--work together to ensure their village's self-reliance in meeting basic needs.
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Political Firsts
Countless American women have struggled to achieve equality with men and gain access to the boardrooms of power. Below is a timeline of women who have changed the face of American politics by being first to run for office, be it the Presidency, the Supreme Court or the Congress.
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Victoria Woodhull
In 1872, women were not allowed to vote. But that didn't stop activist, businesswoman and spiritualist Victoria Woodhull from running for president. She nominated Frederic Douglass, a former slave, as her running mate.
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Granny D.
In June 2004, with Election Day only four months away, the Democratic Party was left without a candidate for the New Hampshire Senate seat. An unlikely contender stepped in to help bring out the vote. Standing just five feet tall, 94-year-old Doris Haddock had far more passion, determination and spunk than most 24-year-olds...
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The Ticket That Might Have Been
Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm was the first African-American woman elected to the United States Congress, and the first to run for President. She said she was proud to run, even though she knew she would lose. The aftermath of Shirley Chisholm's groundbreaking 1972 campaign is the subject of this article by women's rights advocate Gloria Steinem...
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Fashion Is Political
Robin Givhan, the Pulitzer prize-winning fashion editor for the Washington Post, writes about the fashion industry and the ways in which it influences the lives of ordinary people who seldom find themselves walking along a red carpet. She refuses to accept the notion that fashion is somehow for "other" people...
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Cicciolina’s Sexual Politics
Should women use their sexuality for political gain? Or is it better to avoid this route to power? One woman who famously used her sexuality as a political tool was Hungarian-born Ilona Staller, best known as the Italian adult film star, Cicciolina. In 1987, 20,000 people in the district of Rome hand-wrote her name on their ballots, preferring her over forty-seven other Radical Party nominees...
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