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Indira Gandhi’s Darshan
In 1966, Indira Gandhi became India's first female Prime Minister, and in doing so, one of the world's most powerful women. She had grown up in a political household, as the daughter of a Prime Minister, and viewed the intricacies of political life from early childhood onwards...
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Two Million Women Leaders and Counting
When Mahatma Gandhi envisioned a truly independent and democratic India, he envisioned gram swaraj-village self-rule. For Gandhi, true village autonomy meant that all adults--women and men--work together to ensure their village's self-reliance in meeting basic needs.
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A Collage of Her Severally-Inspected Parts
Kashmiri scholar, journalist and former civil servant Ather Zia details the range of ways in which Kashmiri women participate in politics...
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Political Firsts
Countless American women have struggled to achieve equality with men and gain access to the boardrooms of power. Below is a timeline of women who have changed the face of American politics by being first to run for office, be it the Presidency, the Supreme Court or the Congress.
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Granny D.
In June 2004, with Election Day only four months away, the Democratic Party was left without a candidate for the New Hampshire Senate seat. An unlikely contender stepped in to help bring out the vote. Standing just five feet tall, 94-year-old Doris Haddock had far more passion, determination and spunk than most 24-year-olds...
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The Ticket That Might Have Been
Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm was the first African-American woman elected to the United States Congress, and the first to run for President. She said she was proud to run, even though she knew she would lose. The aftermath of Shirley Chisholm's groundbreaking 1972 campaign is the subject of this article by women's rights advocate Gloria Steinem...
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Follow the Leader
On January 16, 2006, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf took the oath of office as Africa's first elected female head of state. A team of filmmakers followed her through her first year in office and the documentary Iron Ladies of Liberia is the result.
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Señora Presidenta
Good afternoon, palace guards! Good afternoon, Mrs. President! On March 11, 2006, Dr. Michelle Bachelet, daughter of a renowned Chilean general who died in prison under Dictator Augusto Pinochet, marched gracefully before the presidential palace guards in Santiago, Chile. She stopped, expertly turned on her heels and called the guards to attention...
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Cartoon As a Political Manifesto
Women don't have a sense of humor. Women don't care about politics. Women don't want to be politicians. For eight years, these false truisms formed a haunting soundtrack to French cartoonist Catherine Beaunez's life.
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10 Questions with Erika Falk
Few Americans are aware that more than thirty women have run for the presidency of the United States. Victoria Woodull, a spiritualist turned successful Wall Street broker, was the first, in 1872. Her name did not even make it on the ballot, and it would take another half-century before women won the right to cast their vote in elections. In Women for President:Media Bias in Eight Campaigns, Erika Falk studied the presidential campaign of Victoria Woodhull and seven other prominent female presidential candidates--Belva Lockwood, Margaret Chase Smith, Shirley Chisholm, Patricia Schroeder, Lenora Fulani, Elizabeth Dole and Carol Moseley Braun...
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