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Namita Kulkarni

India

  • City, State: Bombay, Maharashtra
  • Geographic Location: Asia
  • Languages: English, Hindi, Kannada
  • Age: 28

About me:

Why I create art: A combination of reasons, founded quite simply on the fact that it is what I love doing. The blank canvas, to me, exemplifies infinity. While the sky may symbolize infinity to most others, I’m glad I see that infinity in something so tangible and within my reach – the “blank” canvas. Like life, it is what you make of it, and that is what makes its challenge so real to me.

Creating art is also a way of keeping a visual personal journal, for each painting/drawing is a visual “freeze-frame” capture of the fluid web of thoughts and sensitivities that I dwelled in during its creation. That is what endows each painting its peculiarity and individuality.

Being someone who’s thought process is far more visual than verbal, I realized early on that my creative instincts lend themselves far more naturally to visual expression rather than verbal. That, coupled with my need for ‘newness’, kept propelling me towards art as the perfect answer to that need.

The variety in my art is presumably a ramification of the dynamic medley that life has always been to me. The innumerable diversities, eccentricities and idiosyncrasies - geographical and human - one witnessed over the years, all gladly belong in my artistic arsenal today, waiting to be summoned in the creative process.

My Web site:

Visit My Web site (facebook.com)

Exhibit change by:

By addressing contemporary social issues through my work to open the door to fresh perspectives in place of limiting ones.


Recent Forum Entries

Whose Universe? Women and Universal Human Rights.

15 posts | Friday, March 14, 2014 3:56 AM


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From Exhibiting You:

"Long seen as a problem of only the poorest, the water crisis is increasingly affecting the wealthier nations, economic riches being no insurance against it. The management of water distribution will determine power relations, economic development, the relationship between rich and poor, and the destiny of countries and whole continents." --World Water Federation Report

In Thirst World Countries a twig with 18 leaves stretches across the otherwise gray, bleak painting. The glass vase is half full of water, leaving the leaves to wilt slowly yet still evoking a metaphor of optimism (by seeing the glass as half full instead of half empty). The leaves represent 18 countries that, according to the Water Poverty Index released by the British Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, will be first ones impacted by the imminent water crisis.

 

From Economica:

Artist Namita Kulkarni was inspired to create this painting after watching a little girl in India walk a tightrope as a way to earn money for her family. Kulkarni saw the little girl's balancing act as a metaphor for what women around the world do every day in balancing work and home, family and money, and personal dreams and practical necessities.

 

From Economica:

artist photo

On Justice

To me, justice is a conversation taking place across time and space. Something that is perfectly acceptable today may be considered unjust tomorrow. The selections I want to share with you, I chose because I felt that they were the most powerful bridges for conveying us across the gap where we are currently, to a new place or a new era that better expresses our common humanity.

A powerful bridge had to meet any or all of the following three criteria: first, it had to present the voice of a vulnerable community in a manner that got our attention. As the renowned Nigerian-born author once Chinua Achebe once remarked, “Until the lions have their own historians, the history of the hunt will always glorify the hunter.” It means that when the animals can tell their side of the story—when the hunted can speak—our perception of the hunter will be remarkably different. So I chose pieces that, by capturing the experiences of the hunted, broadened our understanding of our history.

Secondly, I looked for pieces that reflected a spirit of defiance, necessary for propelling women or other vulnerable groups to move beyond the parameters of what is accepted. In one of the pieces I considered and ultimately decided against including in my selections, there was a postcard with the dream “that women would have the support they need to change the world.” Au contraire: I believe women must simply fashion our own mechanisms for securing justice and support, even when it means creating something out of nothing but sheer audacity.

We cannot afford to do what we’ve always done as women—to just take care of the children and the family. We have to go into the larger places we felt we didn’t belong in before, because decisions made in those places are going to reverberate and affect us in our own, very personal, lives.

And, finally, I sought pieces where the subject simply cleared a place to stand and change the world, rather than waiting for permission. The challenge for women is that we’re always waiting, and that waiting in itself is a problem. We cannot wait for permission: to wait for permission is to die waiting.

Learn more about Hafsat Abiola>>

From Exhibiting You:

"Long seen as a problem of only the poorest, the water crisis is increasingly affecting the wealthier nations, economic riches being no insurance against it. The management of water distribution will determine power relations, economic development, the relationship between rich and poor, and the destiny of countries and whole continents." --World Water Federation Report

In Thirst World Countries a twig with 18 leaves stretches across the otherwise gray, bleak painting. The glass vase is half full of water, leaving the leaves to wilt slowly yet still evoking a metaphor of optimism (by seeing the glass as half full instead of half empty). The leaves represent 18 countries that, according to the Water Poverty Index released by the British Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, will be first ones impacted by the imminent water crisis.

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